Spotlight on Psychiatry

Michael E. Thase, MD
Credits: 0.5 CME / CNE
Paths to Functional Recovery in Major Depressive Disorder: Putting the Patient First – A Patient-Centered Approach to Preventing, Detecting, and Managing Adverse Effects of Antidepressants
Michael E. Thase, MD
Medical Education Resources (MER)

Paths to Functional Recovery in Major Depressive Disorder: Putting the Patient First – A Patient-Centered Approach to Preventing, Detecting, and Managing Adverse Effects of Antidepressants

Start

Activity Details

Free CME/CNE
0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
0.5 Contact Hour(s)
Released: January 25, 2022
Expires: January 25, 2023
30 minutes to complete

Jointly Provided By

This activity is jointly provided by Medical Education Resources and CMEology.

Target Audience

Psychiatrists and advanced practice psychiatry clinicians who care for patients with major depressive disorder.

Learning Objectives

  • Evaluate patients being treated for MDD to identify common adverse effects such as sexual dysfunction, weight gain, and sleep disturbance
  • Assess treatment strategies for a patient with MDD who is experiencing an adverse effect on their current MDD therapy

Activity Description

This is one of two related online multimedia activities designed to assess and enhance clinical decision-making through immersive, interactive learning. Participants will use realistic “near-life” education as they make decisions for what comes next – just like real life.

Statement of Educational Need

Adverse effects associated with antidepressants are common. In addition to compromising patients’ health and quality of life, they are one of the most common reasons that individuals with MDD fail to adhere to their treatment plans. To minimize the impact of antidepressant side effects on the lives of patients with MDD, clinicians require education on how to prevent, detect, and manage the most common adverse effects caused by these medications. In this activity, an expert faculty member will support learners as they are asked to respond to patients experiencing side effects related to their antidepressant use. Two cases will be used to illustrate how a patient-centered approach to MDD care can maximize treatment tolerability.

Learning Goal/Purpose
The goal of this activity is to increase clinicians’ knowledge and competence with regard to preventing, detecting, and managing antidepressant side effects, thus minimizing the impact of adverse effects on patients’ lives.

Agenda

  • Prevalence of major antidepressant adverse effects
  • Common adverse effects of antidepressants
  • Case study, sexual dysfunction
  • Case study, weight gain
  • Antidepressant comparative tolerability
  • Strategies for managing antidepressant adverse effects

Faculty

Michael E. Thase, MD
Professor of Psychiatry
Department of Psychiatry
Mood and Anxiety Disorders Treatment and Research Program
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania
Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

Medical Education Resources (MER) ensures balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all of its educational programs. In accordance with this policy, MER identifies conflicts of interest with its instructors, content managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of an activity. Conflicts are resolved by MER to ensure that all scientific research referred to, reported, or used in a continuing education activity conforms to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis. MER is committed to providing its learners with high-quality activities that promote improvements or quality in health care and not the business interest of a commercial interest.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

Advisory/Consultant: Acadia, Inc.; Akili, Inc.; Alkermes PLC; Allergan, Inc. (Forest, Naurex); Clexio Biosciences, Ltd.; H. Lundbeck, A/S; Jazz Pharmaceuticals; Johnson & Johnson (Janssen); Merck & Company, Inc.; Otsuka Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd.; Pfizer, Inc.; Seelos
Grant Support: Acadia, Inc.; Allergan, Inc.; Axsome Therapeutics Inc.; Intracellular, Inc.; Johnson & Johnson (Janssen); Otsuka Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd.; Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI); Takeda
Royalties: American Psychiatric Press; Guilford Publications; Herald House; W.W. Norton & Company, Inc.; Wolters Kluwer

CMEology planners have no relationships to disclose.

MER content reviewers have no relationships to disclose.

Accreditation Statement

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Medical Education Resources (MER) and CMEology. MER is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Medical Education Resources is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

Designation of Credit

Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

This CE activity provides 0.5 contact hour(s) of continuing nursing education.

Instructions for Receiving Credit

There are no fees for participating in and receiving credit for this activity. During the period January 25, 2022 through January 25, 2023, participants must (1) read the learning objectives and faculty disclosures, (2) study the educational activity, (3) complete the posttest

Activity Details

Free CME/CNE
0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
0.5 Contact Hour(s)
Released: January 25, 2022
Expires: January 25, 2023
30 minutes to complete

Jointly Provided By

This activity is jointly provided by Medical Education Resources and CMEology.

Target Audience

Psychiatrists and advanced practice psychiatry clinicians who care for patients with major depressive disorder.

Learning Objectives

  • Evaluate patients being treated for MDD to identify common adverse effects such as sexual dysfunction, weight gain, and sleep disturbance
  • Assess treatment strategies for a patient with MDD who is experiencing an adverse effect on their current MDD therapy

Activity Description

This is one of two related online multimedia activities designed to assess and enhance clinical decision-making through immersive, interactive learning. Participants will use realistic “near-life” education as they make decisions for what comes next – just like real life.

Statement of Educational Need

Adverse effects associated with antidepressants are common. In addition to compromising patients’ health and quality of life, they are one of the most common reasons that individuals with MDD fail to adhere to their treatment plans. To minimize the impact of antidepressant side effects on the lives of patients with MDD, clinicians require education on how to prevent, detect, and manage the most common adverse effects caused by these medications. In this activity, an expert faculty member will support learners as they are asked to respond to patients experiencing side effects related to their antidepressant use. Two cases will be used to illustrate how a patient-centered approach to MDD care can maximize treatment tolerability.

Learning Goal/Purpose
The goal of this activity is to increase clinicians’ knowledge and competence with regard to preventing, detecting, and managing antidepressant side effects, thus minimizing the impact of adverse effects on patients’ lives.

Agenda

  • Prevalence of major antidepressant adverse effects
  • Common adverse effects of antidepressants
  • Case study, sexual dysfunction
  • Case study, weight gain
  • Antidepressant comparative tolerability
  • Strategies for managing antidepressant adverse effects

Faculty

Michael E. Thase, MD
Professor of Psychiatry
Department of Psychiatry
Mood and Anxiety Disorders Treatment and Research Program
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania
Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

Medical Education Resources (MER) ensures balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all of its educational programs. In accordance with this policy, MER identifies conflicts of interest with its instructors, content managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of an activity. Conflicts are resolved by MER to ensure that all scientific research referred to, reported, or used in a continuing education activity conforms to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis. MER is committed to providing its learners with high-quality activities that promote improvements or quality in health care and not the business interest of a commercial interest.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

Advisory/Consultant: Acadia, Inc.; Akili, Inc.; Alkermes PLC; Allergan, Inc. (Forest, Naurex); Clexio Biosciences, Ltd.; H. Lundbeck, A/S; Jazz Pharmaceuticals; Johnson & Johnson (Janssen); Merck & Company, Inc.; Otsuka Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd.; Pfizer, Inc.; Seelos
Grant Support: Acadia, Inc.; Allergan, Inc.; Axsome Therapeutics Inc.; Intracellular, Inc.; Johnson & Johnson (Janssen); Otsuka Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd.; Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI); Takeda
Royalties: American Psychiatric Press; Guilford Publications; Herald House; W.W. Norton & Company, Inc.; Wolters Kluwer

CMEology planners have no relationships to disclose.

MER content reviewers have no relationships to disclose.

Accreditation Statement

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Medical Education Resources (MER) and CMEology. MER is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Medical Education Resources is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

Designation of Credit

Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

This CE activity provides 0.5 contact hour(s) of continuing nursing education.

Instructions for Receiving Credit

There are no fees for participating in and receiving credit for this activity. During the period January 25, 2022 through January 25, 2023, participants must (1) read the learning objectives and faculty disclosures, (2) study the educational activity, (3) complete the posttest

Psychiatry Presentations

Michael E. Thase, MD
0.5 CME / CNE
Medical Education Resources (MER)
Paths to Functional Recovery in Major Depressive Disorder: Putting the Patient First – Combining Patient-Centered Care for Major Depressive Disorder with the Latest Antidepressant Efficacy to Optimize Treatment Plans

Paths to Functional Recovery in Major Depressive Disorder: Putting the Patient First – Combining Patient-Centered Care for Major Depressive Disorder with the Latest Antidepressant Efficacy to Optimize Treatment Plans

Start

Activity Details

Free CME/CNE
0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
0.5 Contact Hour(s)
Released: January 25, 2022
Expires: January 25, 2023
30 minutes to complete

Jointly Provided By

This activity is jointly provided by Medical Education Resources and CMEology.

Target Audience

Psychiatrists and advanced practice psychiatry clinicians who care for patients with major depressive disorder.

Learning Objectives

  • Incorporate patient preferences, values, and goals when developing a care plan
  • Evaluate patients being treated for MDD to identify the presence of residual symptoms, such as cognitive dysfunction
  • Assess treatment strategies for a patient with MDD that will maximize their quality of life and functional recovery

Activity Description

This is one of two related online multimedia activities designed to assess and enhance clinical decision-making through immersive, interactive learning. Participants will use realistic “near-life” education as they make decisions for what comes next – just like real life.

Statement of Educational Need

Only roughly half of patients with MDD achieve recovery after 6 months of treatment. The others continue to experience residual symptoms that impair their ability to function at work, school, and home. To ensure that more patients with MDD achieve functional recovery, clinicians require practical information about how to provide early, optimized care. In this activity, an expert faculty member will support learners as they are asked to track patients’ response to treatment and detect and manage common residual MDD symptoms. Two cases will be used to illustrate how to individualize MDD care to maximize patients’ chances of recovery.

Learning Goal/Purpose
The goal of this activity is to increase clinicians’ knowledge and competence with regard to optimizing MDD treatment plans, thus increasing the proportion of patients with MDD who are able to achieve functional recovery.

Agenda

  • Prevalence of major depressive disorder since COVID-19 pandemic
  • Functional recovery and the importance of helping patients move beyond symptom remission
  • Case study, functional recovery and shared decision-making
  • Residual symptoms that frequently impede functional recovery
  • Case study, residual symptoms
  • Strategies for managing residual symptoms and responding to insufficient progress toward functional recovery

Faculty

Michael E. Thase, MD
Professor of Psychiatry
Department of Psychiatry
Mood and Anxiety Disorders Treatment and Research Program
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania
Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

Medical Education Resources (MER) ensures balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all of its educational programs. In accordance with this policy, MER identifies conflicts of interest with its instructors, content managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of an activity. Conflicts are resolved by MER to ensure that all scientific research referred to, reported, or used in a continuing education activity conforms to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis. MER is committed to providing its learners with high-quality activities that promote improvements or quality in health care and not the business interest of a commercial interest.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

Advisory/Consultant: Acadia, Inc.; Akili, Inc.; Alkermes PLC; Allergan, Inc. (Forest, Naurex); Clexio Biosciences, Ltd.; H. Lundbeck, A/S; Jazz Pharmaceuticals; Johnson & Johnson (Janssen); Merck & Company, Inc.; Otsuka Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd.; Pfizer, Inc.; Seelos
Grant Support: Acadia, Inc.; Allergan, Inc.; Axsome Therapeutics Inc.; Intracellular, Inc.; Johnson & Johnson (Janssen); Otsuka Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd.; Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI); Takeda
Royalties: American Psychiatric Press; Guilford Publications; Herald House; W.W. Norton & Company, Inc.; Wolters Kluwer

CMEology planners have no relationships to disclose.

MER content reviewers have no relationships to disclose.

Accreditation Statement

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Medical Education Resources (MER) and CMEology. MER is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Medical Education Resources is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

Designation of Credit

Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

This CE activity provides 0.5 contact hour(s) of continuing nursing education.

Instructions for Receiving Credit

There are no fees for participating in and receiving credit for this activity. During the period January 25, 2022 through January 25, 2023, participants must (1) read the learning objectives and faculty disclosures, (2) study the educational activity, (3) complete the posttest by recording the best answer to each question, and (4) complete the evaluation form.

A statement of credit will be issued only upon receipt of a completed activity evaluation form and a completed posttest.

Statement of Commercial Support

This activity is supported by an independent educational grant from Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc. and Lundbeck.

Disclaimer

The content and views presented in this educational activity are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the planners. The authors have disclosed if there is any discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the FDA in their presentations. Before prescribing any medicine, primary references and full prescribing information should be consulted. Any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested in this activity should not be used by clinicians without evaluation of their patients’ conditions and possible contraindications or dangers in use, review of any applicable manufacturer’s product information, and comparison with recommendations of other authorities. The information presented in this activity is not meant to serve as a guideline for patient management.

Disclosure of Unlabeled Use

This educational activity may contain discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the FDA. The planners of this activity do not recommend the use of any agent outside of the labeled indications. Please refer to the official prescribing information for each product for discussion of approved indications, contraindications, and warnings.

Contact Information for Questions About the Activity

For questions about this activity, please contact CMEology at: info@cmeology.org or Medical Education Resources at: http://cmepartner.org/contact.

Activity Details

Free CME/CNE
0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
0.5 Contact Hour(s)
Released: January 25, 2022
Expires: January 25, 2023
30 minutes to complete

Jointly Provided By

This activity is jointly provided by Medical Education Resources and CMEology.

Target Audience

Psychiatrists and advanced practice psychiatry clinicians who care for patients with major depressive disorder.

Learning Objectives

  • Incorporate patient preferences, values, and goals when developing a care plan
  • Evaluate patients being treated for MDD to identify the presence of residual symptoms, such as cognitive dysfunction
  • Assess treatment strategies for a patient with MDD that will maximize their quality of life and functional recovery

Activity Description

This is one of two related online multimedia activities designed to assess and enhance clinical decision-making through immersive, interactive learning. Participants will use realistic “near-life” education as they make decisions for what comes next – just like real life.

Statement of Educational Need

Only roughly half of patients with MDD achieve recovery after 6 months of treatment. The others continue to experience residual symptoms that impair their ability to function at work, school, and home. To ensure that more patients with MDD achieve functional recovery, clinicians require practical information about how to provide early, optimized care. In this activity, an expert faculty member will support learners as they are asked to track patients’ response to treatment and detect and manage common residual MDD symptoms. Two cases will be used to illustrate how to individualize MDD care to maximize patients’ chances of recovery.

Learning Goal/Purpose
The goal of this activity is to increase clinicians’ knowledge and competence with regard to optimizing MDD treatment plans, thus increasing the proportion of patients with MDD who are able to achieve functional recovery.

Agenda

  • Prevalence of major depressive disorder since COVID-19 pandemic
  • Functional recovery and the importance of helping patients move beyond symptom remission
  • Case study, functional recovery and shared decision-making
  • Residual symptoms that frequently impede functional recovery
  • Case study, residual symptoms
  • Strategies for managing residual symptoms and responding to insufficient progress toward functional recovery

Faculty

Michael E. Thase, MD
Professor of Psychiatry
Department of Psychiatry
Mood and Anxiety Disorders Treatment and Research Program
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania
Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

Medical Education Resources (MER) ensures balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all of its educational programs. In accordance with this policy, MER identifies conflicts of interest with its instructors, content managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of an activity. Conflicts are resolved by MER to ensure that all scientific research referred to, reported, or used in a continuing education activity conforms to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis. MER is committed to providing its learners with high-quality activities that promote improvements or quality in health care and not the business interest of a commercial interest.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

Advisory/Consultant: Acadia, Inc.; Akili, Inc.; Alkermes PLC; Allergan, Inc. (Forest, Naurex); Clexio Biosciences, Ltd.; H. Lundbeck, A/S; Jazz Pharmaceuticals; Johnson & Johnson (Janssen); Merck & Company, Inc.; Otsuka Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd.; Pfizer, Inc.; Seelos
Grant Support: Acadia, Inc.; Allergan, Inc.; Axsome Therapeutics Inc.; Intracellular, Inc.; Johnson & Johnson (Janssen); Otsuka Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd.; Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI); Takeda
Royalties: American Psychiatric Press; Guilford Publications; Herald House; W.W. Norton & Company, Inc.; Wolters Kluwer

CMEology planners have no relationships to disclose.

MER content reviewers have no relationships to disclose.

Accreditation Statement

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Medical Education Resources (MER) and CMEology. MER is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Medical Education Resources is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

Designation of Credit

Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

This CE activity provides 0.5 contact hour(s) of continuing nursing education.

Instructions for Receiving Credit

There are no fees for participating in and receiving credit for this activity. During the period January 25, 2022 through January 25, 2023, participants must (1) read the learning objectives and faculty disclosures, (2) study the educational activity, (3) complete the posttest by recording the best answer to each question, and (4) complete the evaluation form.

A statement of credit will be issued only upon receipt of a completed activity evaluation form and a completed posttest.

Statement of Commercial Support

This activity is supported by an independent educational grant from Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc. and Lundbeck.

Disclaimer

The content and views presented in this educational activity are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the planners. The authors have disclosed if there is any discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the FDA in their presentations. Before prescribing any medicine, primary references and full prescribing information should be consulted. Any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested in this activity should not be used by clinicians without evaluation of their patients’ conditions and possible contraindications or dangers in use, review of any applicable manufacturer’s product information, and comparison with recommendations of other authorities. The information presented in this activity is not meant to serve as a guideline for patient management.

Disclosure of Unlabeled Use

This educational activity may contain discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the FDA. The planners of this activity do not recommend the use of any agent outside of the labeled indications. Please refer to the official prescribing information for each product for discussion of approved indications, contraindications, and warnings.

Contact Information for Questions About the Activity

For questions about this activity, please contact CMEology at: info@cmeology.org or Medical Education Resources at: http://cmepartner.org/contact.

Michael E. Thase, MD
0.5 CME / CNE
Medical Education Resources (MER)
Paths to Functional Recovery in Major Depressive Disorder: Putting the Patient First – A Patient-Centered Approach to Preventing, Detecting, and Managing Adverse Effects of Antidepressants

Paths to Functional Recovery in Major Depressive Disorder: Putting the Patient First – A Patient-Centered Approach to Preventing, Detecting, and Managing Adverse Effects of Antidepressants

Start

Activity Details

Free CME/CNE
0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
0.5 Contact Hour(s)
Released: January 25, 2022
Expires: January 25, 2023
30 minutes to complete

Jointly Provided By

This activity is jointly provided by Medical Education Resources and CMEology.

Target Audience

Psychiatrists and advanced practice psychiatry clinicians who care for patients with major depressive disorder.

Learning Objectives

  • Evaluate patients being treated for MDD to identify common adverse effects such as sexual dysfunction, weight gain, and sleep disturbance
  • Assess treatment strategies for a patient with MDD who is experiencing an adverse effect on their current MDD therapy

Activity Description

This is one of two related online multimedia activities designed to assess and enhance clinical decision-making through immersive, interactive learning. Participants will use realistic “near-life” education as they make decisions for what comes next – just like real life.

Statement of Educational Need

Adverse effects associated with antidepressants are common. In addition to compromising patients’ health and quality of life, they are one of the most common reasons that individuals with MDD fail to adhere to their treatment plans. To minimize the impact of antidepressant side effects on the lives of patients with MDD, clinicians require education on how to prevent, detect, and manage the most common adverse effects caused by these medications. In this activity, an expert faculty member will support learners as they are asked to respond to patients experiencing side effects related to their antidepressant use. Two cases will be used to illustrate how a patient-centered approach to MDD care can maximize treatment tolerability.

Learning Goal/Purpose
The goal of this activity is to increase clinicians’ knowledge and competence with regard to preventing, detecting, and managing antidepressant side effects, thus minimizing the impact of adverse effects on patients’ lives.

Agenda

  • Prevalence of major antidepressant adverse effects
  • Common adverse effects of antidepressants
  • Case study, sexual dysfunction
  • Case study, weight gain
  • Antidepressant comparative tolerability
  • Strategies for managing antidepressant adverse effects

Faculty

Michael E. Thase, MD
Professor of Psychiatry
Department of Psychiatry
Mood and Anxiety Disorders Treatment and Research Program
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania
Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

Medical Education Resources (MER) ensures balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all of its educational programs. In accordance with this policy, MER identifies conflicts of interest with its instructors, content managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of an activity. Conflicts are resolved by MER to ensure that all scientific research referred to, reported, or used in a continuing education activity conforms to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis. MER is committed to providing its learners with high-quality activities that promote improvements or quality in health care and not the business interest of a commercial interest.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

Advisory/Consultant: Acadia, Inc.; Akili, Inc.; Alkermes PLC; Allergan, Inc. (Forest, Naurex); Clexio Biosciences, Ltd.; H. Lundbeck, A/S; Jazz Pharmaceuticals; Johnson & Johnson (Janssen); Merck & Company, Inc.; Otsuka Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd.; Pfizer, Inc.; Seelos
Grant Support: Acadia, Inc.; Allergan, Inc.; Axsome Therapeutics Inc.; Intracellular, Inc.; Johnson & Johnson (Janssen); Otsuka Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd.; Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI); Takeda
Royalties: American Psychiatric Press; Guilford Publications; Herald House; W.W. Norton & Company, Inc.; Wolters Kluwer

CMEology planners have no relationships to disclose.

MER content reviewers have no relationships to disclose.

Accreditation Statement

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Medical Education Resources (MER) and CMEology. MER is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Medical Education Resources is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

Designation of Credit

Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

This CE activity provides 0.5 contact hour(s) of continuing nursing education.

Instructions for Receiving Credit

There are no fees for participating in and receiving credit for this activity. During the period January 25, 2022 through January 25, 2023, participants must (1) read the learning objectives and faculty disclosures, (2) study the educational activity, (3) complete the posttest

Activity Details

Free CME/CNE
0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
0.5 Contact Hour(s)
Released: January 25, 2022
Expires: January 25, 2023
30 minutes to complete

Jointly Provided By

This activity is jointly provided by Medical Education Resources and CMEology.

Target Audience

Psychiatrists and advanced practice psychiatry clinicians who care for patients with major depressive disorder.

Learning Objectives

  • Evaluate patients being treated for MDD to identify common adverse effects such as sexual dysfunction, weight gain, and sleep disturbance
  • Assess treatment strategies for a patient with MDD who is experiencing an adverse effect on their current MDD therapy

Activity Description

This is one of two related online multimedia activities designed to assess and enhance clinical decision-making through immersive, interactive learning. Participants will use realistic “near-life” education as they make decisions for what comes next – just like real life.

Statement of Educational Need

Adverse effects associated with antidepressants are common. In addition to compromising patients’ health and quality of life, they are one of the most common reasons that individuals with MDD fail to adhere to their treatment plans. To minimize the impact of antidepressant side effects on the lives of patients with MDD, clinicians require education on how to prevent, detect, and manage the most common adverse effects caused by these medications. In this activity, an expert faculty member will support learners as they are asked to respond to patients experiencing side effects related to their antidepressant use. Two cases will be used to illustrate how a patient-centered approach to MDD care can maximize treatment tolerability.

Learning Goal/Purpose
The goal of this activity is to increase clinicians’ knowledge and competence with regard to preventing, detecting, and managing antidepressant side effects, thus minimizing the impact of adverse effects on patients’ lives.

Agenda

  • Prevalence of major antidepressant adverse effects
  • Common adverse effects of antidepressants
  • Case study, sexual dysfunction
  • Case study, weight gain
  • Antidepressant comparative tolerability
  • Strategies for managing antidepressant adverse effects

Faculty

Michael E. Thase, MD
Professor of Psychiatry
Department of Psychiatry
Mood and Anxiety Disorders Treatment and Research Program
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania
Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

Medical Education Resources (MER) ensures balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all of its educational programs. In accordance with this policy, MER identifies conflicts of interest with its instructors, content managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of an activity. Conflicts are resolved by MER to ensure that all scientific research referred to, reported, or used in a continuing education activity conforms to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis. MER is committed to providing its learners with high-quality activities that promote improvements or quality in health care and not the business interest of a commercial interest.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

Advisory/Consultant: Acadia, Inc.; Akili, Inc.; Alkermes PLC; Allergan, Inc. (Forest, Naurex); Clexio Biosciences, Ltd.; H. Lundbeck, A/S; Jazz Pharmaceuticals; Johnson & Johnson (Janssen); Merck & Company, Inc.; Otsuka Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd.; Pfizer, Inc.; Seelos
Grant Support: Acadia, Inc.; Allergan, Inc.; Axsome Therapeutics Inc.; Intracellular, Inc.; Johnson & Johnson (Janssen); Otsuka Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd.; Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI); Takeda
Royalties: American Psychiatric Press; Guilford Publications; Herald House; W.W. Norton & Company, Inc.; Wolters Kluwer

CMEology planners have no relationships to disclose.

MER content reviewers have no relationships to disclose.

Accreditation Statement

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Medical Education Resources (MER) and CMEology. MER is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Medical Education Resources is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

Designation of Credit

Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

This CE activity provides 0.5 contact hour(s) of continuing nursing education.

Instructions for Receiving Credit

There are no fees for participating in and receiving credit for this activity. During the period January 25, 2022 through January 25, 2023, participants must (1) read the learning objectives and faculty disclosures, (2) study the educational activity, (3) complete the posttest