Spotlight on Ophthalmology

Credits: 0.25 CME
Bridging the Gap Between Diabetic Primary Care and Retinal Specialty Practice - Unmet Eye Care Needs in Diabetes Mellitus
Carl D. Regillo, MD, FACS
Medical Education Resources (MER)

Bridging the Gap Between Diabetic Primary Care and Retinal Specialty Practice - Unmet Eye Care Needs in Diabetes Mellitus

Start

Activity Details

Free CME
0.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
Released: May 15, 2020
Expires: May 15, 2021
15 minutes to complete

Accredited By

Jointly Provided By

Creative Services Provided By

Target Audience

Primary Care Physicians

Learning Objectives

Describe the unmet need for diabetic eye care and the risks associated with delayed intervention.

Activity Description

Infinity Medical Education™ and infograph-ed™ have created a highly engaging, interactive learning experience. A series of three modular infographics will build on each other. The goal of this activity is to educate primary care clinicians on the most critical needs in diabetic care that are not being regularly met. Namely, patients are missing annual diabetic eye exams and are losing vision as a result. Primary care physicians are at the front line of diabetic care, directing patients through their healthcare journey, and these clinicians provide an essential touchpoint at which patients with diabetes can and should be directed to eye care providers.

Statement of Educational Need

Diabetes is a growing health crisis and primary care physicians are at the front line, directing patients through several other steps along their healthcare journey. Unfortunately, one of the most critical needs in diabetic care is not regularly met. Specifically, patients are missing annual diabetic eye exams and are losing vision as a result. Countless patients go blind because they either never enter the treatment continuum or they miss follow-up appointments. This comes at a time when retinal specialists are calling for treatment at earlier stages of disease.

The primary care visit is an essential touchpoint at which patients with diabetes can and should be directed to eye care providers who can deliver much-needed diagnostic services and treatments. This interactive learning opportunity will engage physicians and inspire a more proactive approach to patient education. Physicians will learn the unmet need for diabetic eye care and the risks associated with delayed intervention. Additionally, they will become well-acquainted with the science behind vision-saving treatments for patients with diabetic macular edema and diabetic retinopathy. Furthermore, this program will emphasize the potential advantages of moving patients into treatment sooner rather than later.

Topics

  • Growing incidence of diabetes
  • Diabetic retinopathy—a leading cause of blindness
  • Lack of awareness of eye disease risk among patients with diabetes
  • Dilated eye exam recommendations and frequency
  • Management and follow-up obstacles

Faculty

Carl D. Regillo, MD, FACS
Director, Retina Service
Wills Eye Hospital
Professor of Ophthalmology
Thomas Jefferson University
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

Medical Education Resources (MER) and Infinity Medical Education require instructors, planners, managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of this activity to disclose any real or apparent conflict of interest (COI) they may have as related to the content of this activity. All identified COI are thoroughly vetted and resolved according to MER policy. MER is committed to providing its learners with high quality activities and related materials that promote improvements or quality in healthcare and not a specific proprietary business interest of a commercial interest.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships or relationships to products or devices they or their spouses/life partners have with commercial interest related to the content of this activity:

Carl D. Regillo, MD, FACS, has disclosed grant research funded by Allergan, Genentech, Novartis, Regeneron, Kodiak, Chengdu Kanghong, Opthea, Adverum, RegenxBio, and Graybug. Additionally, he has received consulting fees from Allergan, Genentech, Novartis, Chendu Kanghong, Kodiak, Adverum, and Graybug. He has agreed to disclose any unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products referenced in her/his presentation.

Medical Education Resources’ planners and managers have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

The employees of Infinity Medical Education, LLC have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Accreditation Statement

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Medical Education Resources (MER) and Infinity Medical Education. MER is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation of Credit

Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 

Instructions for Receiving Credit

A statement of credit will be issued upon receipt of a completed activity evaluation form and a completed posttest with a score of 70% or better.

Statement of Commercial Support

This continuing medical education activity is supported through an unrestricted educational grant from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals.

Disclosure Regarding Unlabeled Use

This activity may contain discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the US Food and Drug Administration or European Medicines Agency. Please refer to the official prescribing information for each product for discussions of approved indications, contraindications, and warnings.

Disclaimer

Participants have an implied responsibility to use the newly acquired information to enhance patient outcomes and their own professional development. The information presented in this activity is not meant to serve as a guideline for patient management. Any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested in this activity should not be used by clinicians without evaluation of their patients’ conditions and possible contraindications or dangers in use, review of any applicable manufacturer’s product information, and comparison with recommendations of other authorities.

Contact Information for Questions About the Activity

Medical Education Resources
http://cmepartner.org/contact or call toll-free: 800-421-3756

Activity Details

Free CME
0.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
Released: May 15, 2020
Expires: May 15, 2021
15 minutes to complete

Accredited By

Jointly Provided By

Creative Services Provided By

Target Audience

Primary Care Physicians

Learning Objectives

Describe the unmet need for diabetic eye care and the risks associated with delayed intervention.

Activity Description

Infinity Medical Education™ and infograph-ed™ have created a highly engaging, interactive learning experience. A series of three modular infographics will build on each other. The goal of this activity is to educate primary care clinicians on the most critical needs in diabetic care that are not being regularly met. Namely, patients are missing annual diabetic eye exams and are losing vision as a result. Primary care physicians are at the front line of diabetic care, directing patients through their healthcare journey, and these clinicians provide an essential touchpoint at which patients with diabetes can and should be directed to eye care providers.

Statement of Educational Need

Diabetes is a growing health crisis and primary care physicians are at the front line, directing patients through several other steps along their healthcare journey. Unfortunately, one of the most critical needs in diabetic care is not regularly met. Specifically, patients are missing annual diabetic eye exams and are losing vision as a result. Countless patients go blind because they either never enter the treatment continuum or they miss follow-up appointments. This comes at a time when retinal specialists are calling for treatment at earlier stages of disease.

The primary care visit is an essential touchpoint at which patients with diabetes can and should be directed to eye care providers who can deliver much-needed diagnostic services and treatments. This interactive learning opportunity will engage physicians and inspire a more proactive approach to patient education. Physicians will learn the unmet need for diabetic eye care and the risks associated with delayed intervention. Additionally, they will become well-acquainted with the science behind vision-saving treatments for patients with diabetic macular edema and diabetic retinopathy. Furthermore, this program will emphasize the potential advantages of moving patients into treatment sooner rather than later.

Topics

  • Growing incidence of diabetes
  • Diabetic retinopathy—a leading cause of blindness
  • Lack of awareness of eye disease risk among patients with diabetes
  • Dilated eye exam recommendations and frequency
  • Management and follow-up obstacles

Faculty

Carl D. Regillo, MD, FACS
Director, Retina Service
Wills Eye Hospital
Professor of Ophthalmology
Thomas Jefferson University
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

Medical Education Resources (MER) and Infinity Medical Education require instructors, planners, managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of this activity to disclose any real or apparent conflict of interest (COI) they may have as related to the content of this activity. All identified COI are thoroughly vetted and resolved according to MER policy. MER is committed to providing its learners with high quality activities and related materials that promote improvements or quality in healthcare and not a specific proprietary business interest of a commercial interest.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships or relationships to products or devices they or their spouses/life partners have with commercial interest related to the content of this activity:

Carl D. Regillo, MD, FACS, has disclosed grant research funded by Allergan, Genentech, Novartis, Regeneron, Kodiak, Chengdu Kanghong, Opthea, Adverum, RegenxBio, and Graybug. Additionally, he has received consulting fees from Allergan, Genentech, Novartis, Chendu Kanghong, Kodiak, Adverum, and Graybug. He has agreed to disclose any unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products referenced in her/his presentation.

Medical Education Resources’ planners and managers have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

The employees of Infinity Medical Education, LLC have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Accreditation Statement

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Medical Education Resources (MER) and Infinity Medical Education. MER is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation of Credit

Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 

Instructions for Receiving Credit

A statement of credit will be issued upon receipt of a completed activity evaluation form and a completed posttest with a score of 70% or better.

Statement of Commercial Support

This continuing medical education activity is supported through an unrestricted educational grant from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals.

Disclosure Regarding Unlabeled Use

This activity may contain discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the US Food and Drug Administration or European Medicines Agency. Please refer to the official prescribing information for each product for discussions of approved indications, contraindications, and warnings.

Disclaimer

Participants have an implied responsibility to use the newly acquired information to enhance patient outcomes and their own professional development. The information presented in this activity is not meant to serve as a guideline for patient management. Any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested in this activity should not be used by clinicians without evaluation of their patients’ conditions and possible contraindications or dangers in use, review of any applicable manufacturer’s product information, and comparison with recommendations of other authorities.

Contact Information for Questions About the Activity

Medical Education Resources
http://cmepartner.org/contact or call toll-free: 800-421-3756

Ophthalmology Presentations

0.50 CME / CE
Clinical Care Options
Managing Diabetic Eye Disease in the Latino/Hispanic Community: A Case-Based Review of Best Practices

Managing Diabetic Eye Disease in the Latino/Hispanic Community: A Case-Based Review of Best Practices

Start

Activity Details

Free CME/CE
0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™/
AAPA Category 1 CME credit(s)
Released: January 8, 2021
Expires: January 7, 2022
30 minutes to complete

Accredited By

Jointly Provided By

Target Audience

This program is intended for physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and other healthcare providers who care for patients with diabetic eye disease in the Latino/Hispanic community.

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss the unmet need for improved diabetic eye care in the Latino/Hispanic community.
  • Outline risks associated with delayed intervention in patients with diabetic eye disease.
  • Describe standards of care and preferred practice patterns for screening and diagnosing diabetic eye disease.
  • Explain the benefits of timely anti-VEGF treatments for patients with diabetic macular edema and diabetic retinopathy.

Activity Description

This program aims to raise awareness among primary care physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants—arming them with strategies to identify, evaluate and address key biological, social, psychological and social factors that influence the development and course of retinal disease in the Latino/Hispanic population. As front line providers, primary care is uniquely positioned to direct patients to necessary tertiary care services. Throughout this interactive learning opportunity, participants will learn about the unmet need for diabetic eye care and the risks associated with delayed intervention. Best practices in screening, diagnosis, and referral also will be described. Finally, participants will become well acquainted with the science behind vision-saving treatments for patients with diabetic macular edema and diabetic retinopathy.

Statement of Educational Need

The primary care visit is an essential touch-point at which diabetic patients can and should be directed to eye care providers who can deliver much-needed diagnostic services and treatments. Unfortunately, countless patients go blind because they either never enter the treatment continuum or they miss follow-up appointments. This comes at a time when retinal specialists are calling for treatment at earlier stages of disease.

The Latino/Hispanic population is at particularly high risk. This group, which is expected to reach 30% of the total US population by 2050, is more likely to develop diabetes-related complications, often has a higher mortality rate, and receives lower quality of health care when compared to mainstream groups.1

With so many Hispanics failing to adhere to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), prompt and effective intervention is essential.2,3 Indeed, one of the most critical needs in diabetic care is not regularly met. Namely, patients are missing annual diabetic eye exams and are losing vision as a result. This program will utilize a case-based approach to optimize diabetes patient education for the Latino/Hispanic community, promote adherence to recommended eye exams and encourage earlier-stage treatment when indicated.

1Caballero AE. Transcultural diabetes care: a call for addressing the patient as a whole. Endocr Pract. 2019 Jul;25(7):766-768.

2Hu J, Wallace DC, McCoy TP, Amirehsani KA. A family-based diabetes intervention for Hispanic adults and their family members. Diabetes Educ. 2014;40(1):48–59. doi:10.1177/0145721713512682

3Faber AJ. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Minority health: Recent findings. 2009

Agenda

  • Latino/Hispanic population growth in the US
  • Healthcare disparities
  • Diabetic eye disease risk and complications
  • Eye exam frequency recommendations
  • Triage and other practical diagnostic challenges
  • Screening and exam recommendations
  • Evidence-based best practices for diagnosing diabetic eye disease
  • The most commonly performed procedure in ophthalmology
  • Anti-VEGF treatments for DME
  • Anti-VEGF treatments for DR
  • Anti-VEGF treatments for NPDR

Faculty

Rishi P. Singh, MD
Staff Physician
Cole Eye Institute
Cleveland Clinic Foundation
Associate Professor of Ophthalmology
Lerner College of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University
Cleveland, Ohio

Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

Clinical Care Options, LLC (CCO) requires instructors, planners, managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of this activity to disclose any relevant conflict of interest (COI) they may have as related to the content of this activity. All identified COI are thoroughly vetted and resolved according to CCO policy. CCO is committed to providing its learners with high-quality CME/CE activities and related materials that promote improvements or quality in healthcare and not a specific proprietary business interest of a commercial interest.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships or relationships to products or devices they or their spouses/life partners have with commercial interest related to the content of this activity:

Rishi P. Singh, MD, has disclosed grant research funding by Apellis and Grayburg. Dr Singh also discloses he receives consulting fees from Genentech, Regeneron, Zeiss, Optos, Bausch and Lomb, Novartis and Alcon.

Clinical Care Options’ Planners and Managers have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

The employees of Infinity Medical Education, LLC have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Accreditation Statement

In support of improving patient care, this activity has been planned and implemented by Clinical Care Options, LLC (CCO) and Infinity Medical Education. Clinical Care Options, LLC is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

Designation of Credit

CCO designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Clinical Care Options, LLC has been authorized by the American Academy of PAs (AAPA) to award AAPA Category 1 CME credit for activities planned in accordance with AAPA CME Criteria. This activity is designated for 0.5 AAPA Category 1 CME credit. Approval is valid until January 7, 2022. PAs should only claim commensurate with the extent of their participation.

Instructions for Receiving Credit

A statement of credit will be issued upon receipt of a completed activity evaluation form and a completed posttest with a score of 66% or better.

Statement of Commercial Support

This continuing medical education activity is supported through an unrestricted educational grant from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals.

Disclosure Regarding Unlabeled Use

This activity may contain discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the US Food and Drug Administration or European Medicines Agency. Please refer to the official prescribing information for each product discussed for discussions of approved indications, contraindications, and warnings.

Disclaimer

Participants have an implied responsibility to use the newly acquired information to enhance patient outcomes and their own professional development. The information presented in this activity is not meant to serve as a guideline for patient management. Any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested in this activity should not be used by clinicians without evaluation of their patients’ conditions and possible contraindications or dangers in use, review of any applicable manufacturer’s product information, and comparison with recommendations of other authorities.

Contact Information for Questions About the Activity

Anne Rojas
President
Infinity Medical Education, LLC
Anne.rojas@infinitymeded.com

Activity Details

Free CME/CE
0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™/
AAPA Category 1 CME credit(s)
Released: January 8, 2021
Expires: January 7, 2022
30 minutes to complete

Accredited By

Jointly Provided By

Target Audience

This program is intended for physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and other healthcare providers who care for patients with diabetic eye disease in the Latino/Hispanic community.

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss the unmet need for improved diabetic eye care in the Latino/Hispanic community.
  • Outline risks associated with delayed intervention in patients with diabetic eye disease.
  • Describe standards of care and preferred practice patterns for screening and diagnosing diabetic eye disease.
  • Explain the benefits of timely anti-VEGF treatments for patients with diabetic macular edema and diabetic retinopathy.

Activity Description

This program aims to raise awareness among primary care physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants—arming them with strategies to identify, evaluate and address key biological, social, psychological and social factors that influence the development and course of retinal disease in the Latino/Hispanic population. As front line providers, primary care is uniquely positioned to direct patients to necessary tertiary care services. Throughout this interactive learning opportunity, participants will learn about the unmet need for diabetic eye care and the risks associated with delayed intervention. Best practices in screening, diagnosis, and referral also will be described. Finally, participants will become well acquainted with the science behind vision-saving treatments for patients with diabetic macular edema and diabetic retinopathy.

Statement of Educational Need

The primary care visit is an essential touch-point at which diabetic patients can and should be directed to eye care providers who can deliver much-needed diagnostic services and treatments. Unfortunately, countless patients go blind because they either never enter the treatment continuum or they miss follow-up appointments. This comes at a time when retinal specialists are calling for treatment at earlier stages of disease.

The Latino/Hispanic population is at particularly high risk. This group, which is expected to reach 30% of the total US population by 2050, is more likely to develop diabetes-related complications, often has a higher mortality rate, and receives lower quality of health care when compared to mainstream groups.1

With so many Hispanics failing to adhere to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), prompt and effective intervention is essential.2,3 Indeed, one of the most critical needs in diabetic care is not regularly met. Namely, patients are missing annual diabetic eye exams and are losing vision as a result. This program will utilize a case-based approach to optimize diabetes patient education for the Latino/Hispanic community, promote adherence to recommended eye exams and encourage earlier-stage treatment when indicated.

1Caballero AE. Transcultural diabetes care: a call for addressing the patient as a whole. Endocr Pract. 2019 Jul;25(7):766-768.

2Hu J, Wallace DC, McCoy TP, Amirehsani KA. A family-based diabetes intervention for Hispanic adults and their family members. Diabetes Educ. 2014;40(1):48–59. doi:10.1177/0145721713512682

3Faber AJ. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Minority health: Recent findings. 2009

Agenda

  • Latino/Hispanic population growth in the US
  • Healthcare disparities
  • Diabetic eye disease risk and complications
  • Eye exam frequency recommendations
  • Triage and other practical diagnostic challenges
  • Screening and exam recommendations
  • Evidence-based best practices for diagnosing diabetic eye disease
  • The most commonly performed procedure in ophthalmology
  • Anti-VEGF treatments for DME
  • Anti-VEGF treatments for DR
  • Anti-VEGF treatments for NPDR

Faculty

Rishi P. Singh, MD
Staff Physician
Cole Eye Institute
Cleveland Clinic Foundation
Associate Professor of Ophthalmology
Lerner College of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University
Cleveland, Ohio

Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

Clinical Care Options, LLC (CCO) requires instructors, planners, managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of this activity to disclose any relevant conflict of interest (COI) they may have as related to the content of this activity. All identified COI are thoroughly vetted and resolved according to CCO policy. CCO is committed to providing its learners with high-quality CME/CE activities and related materials that promote improvements or quality in healthcare and not a specific proprietary business interest of a commercial interest.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships or relationships to products or devices they or their spouses/life partners have with commercial interest related to the content of this activity:

Rishi P. Singh, MD, has disclosed grant research funding by Apellis and Grayburg. Dr Singh also discloses he receives consulting fees from Genentech, Regeneron, Zeiss, Optos, Bausch and Lomb, Novartis and Alcon.

Clinical Care Options’ Planners and Managers have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

The employees of Infinity Medical Education, LLC have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Accreditation Statement

In support of improving patient care, this activity has been planned and implemented by Clinical Care Options, LLC (CCO) and Infinity Medical Education. Clinical Care Options, LLC is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

Designation of Credit

CCO designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Clinical Care Options, LLC has been authorized by the American Academy of PAs (AAPA) to award AAPA Category 1 CME credit for activities planned in accordance with AAPA CME Criteria. This activity is designated for 0.5 AAPA Category 1 CME credit. Approval is valid until January 7, 2022. PAs should only claim commensurate with the extent of their participation.

Instructions for Receiving Credit

A statement of credit will be issued upon receipt of a completed activity evaluation form and a completed posttest with a score of 66% or better.

Statement of Commercial Support

This continuing medical education activity is supported through an unrestricted educational grant from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals.

Disclosure Regarding Unlabeled Use

This activity may contain discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the US Food and Drug Administration or European Medicines Agency. Please refer to the official prescribing information for each product discussed for discussions of approved indications, contraindications, and warnings.

Disclaimer

Participants have an implied responsibility to use the newly acquired information to enhance patient outcomes and their own professional development. The information presented in this activity is not meant to serve as a guideline for patient management. Any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested in this activity should not be used by clinicians without evaluation of their patients’ conditions and possible contraindications or dangers in use, review of any applicable manufacturer’s product information, and comparison with recommendations of other authorities.

Contact Information for Questions About the Activity

Anne Rojas
President
Infinity Medical Education, LLC
Anne.rojas@infinitymeded.com

1.25 CME
Academy for Continued Healthcare Learning
New Horizons in Migraine Prevention: Pathways to Personalized Care with CGRPs—the Year in Review

New Horizons in Migraine Prevention: Pathways to Personalized Care with CGRPs—the Year in Review

Start

Activity Details

Free CME
1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
Released: December 30, 2020
Expires: November 21, 2021
75 minutes to complete

Accredited By

Target Audience

This activity is intended for neurologists, headache specialists, pain specialists, NPs, PAs, and other HCPs who treat patients with migraine disorder.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  • Develop effective strategies for incorporating CGRP mABs into daily clinical practice
  • Formulate comprehensive management plans for migraine patients on preventative treatment
  • Review current treatment guidelines and patient eligibility for use of CGRP mABs

Activity Description

Join an expert faculty panel as they discuss incorporating anti-CGRP monoclonal antibodies into daily clinical practice for migraine prevention. This video-based session will integrate didactic presentation, a case-based panel discussion, and expert review of clinical evidence, guideline recommendations, special considerations, and real-world use.

Statement of Educational Need

Migraines represent a common, debilitating disorder that continues to be both undertreated and underdiagnosed. Ninety-five percent of chronic migraine patients do not receive appropriate diagnosis or care, and the few that do, suffer from poor long-term treatment adherence. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) monoclonal antibodies are an emerging preventative migraine therapy class that offer benefits over traditional systemic prophylaxis. This activity will review best practices for incorporating CGRP mAbs into daily clinical practice.

Chair

Jessica Ailani, MD, FAHS, FAAN
Professor, Neurology
Director, Headache Center
Medstar Georgetown University Hospital
Washington, DC

Faculty

David W. Dodick, MD
Professor of Neurology, Department of Neurology
Mayo Clinic College of Medicine
Consultant in Neurology and Program Director, Mayo Clinic Neurology Residency Program
Director, Headache, Sports Neurology, and Concussion Programs
Mayo Clinic
Scottsdale, AZ

Lawrence C. Newman, MD, FAHS, FAAN
Professor, Neurology
NYU Grossman School of Medicine
Director, Headache Division
NYU Langone Health
New York, NY

Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

The Academy for Continued Healthcare Learning (ACHL) requires that the faculty participating in a CME activity disclose all affiliations or other financial relationships (1) with the manufacturers of any commercial product(s) and/or provider(s) of commercial services discussed in an educational presentation and (2) with any commercial supporters of the activity. All conflicts of interest have been resolved prior to this CME activity.

The following financial relationships have been provided:

Jessica Ailani, MD, FAHS, FAAN
Consulting Agreements: Alder, Amgen, Allergan, Biohaven, Eli Lilly and Company, Impel, Neurodiem, Revance, Satsuma, Theranica, Teva, Zosano
Speakers’ Bureau: Allergan, Amgen, Biohaven, Eli Lilly and Company, Teva

David W. Dodick, MD
Board of Directors: Epien Medical
Consulting Agreements: Allergan, Amgen, Biohaven Pharmaceuticals, Cerecin, Clexio Biosciences Ltd., Ctrl M Health, Eli Lilly and Company, eNeura, Equinox Pharma, Linpharma, Lundbeck, Novartis, Impel Neuro Pharma, Nocira, Pieris Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Promius Pharma, LLC, Revance, Satsuma Pharmaceuticals, Theranica, WL Gore, XoC Pharmaceuticals, Zosano Pharma, Upjohn (Division of Pfizer)
Patent 17189376.1-1466:vTitle: Botulinum Toxin Dosage Regimen for Chronic Migraine Prophylaxis
Stock Options: Ctrl M Health, Epien Medical, Healint, Nocira, Theranica

Lawrence C. Newman, MD, FAHS, FAAN
Advisory Board: Allergan, Amgen, Eli Lilly and Company, Supernus, Theranica

Discussion of Off-Label, Investigational, or Experimental Drug/Device Use: None 

Accreditation Statement

The Academy for Continued Healthcare Learning is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation of Credit

The Academy for Continued Healthcare Learning designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nurse practitioners may participate in this educational activity and earn a certificate of completing as AANP accepts AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ through its reciprocity agreements.

Instructions for Receiving Credit

This activity will take approximately 75 minutes to complete. To receive credit, participants are required to complete the pretest, view the online activity and complete the posttest and evaluation. To receive credit, 75% must be achieved on the posttest. A certificate will be immediately available. There is no fee to participate in the activity or for the generation of the certificate.

Statement of Commercial Support

Supported by an educational grant from Lundbeck.

Disclaimer Statement/Disclosure of Unlabeled Use

The content for this activity was developed independently of the commercial supporter. All materials are included with permission. The opinions expressed are those of the faculty and are not to be construed as those of the publisher or grantor.

This educational activity was planned and produced in accordance with the ACCME Accreditation Criteria, Policies, and Standards for Commercial Support. Recommendations involving clinical medicine in a continuing medical education (CME) activity must be based on evidence that is accepted within the profession of medicine as adequate justification for their indications and contraindications in the care of patients. All scientific research referred to, reported, or used in CME in support or justification of a patient care recommendation must conform to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis.

This CME activity might describe the off-label, investigational, or experimental use of medications and/or devices that may exceed their FDA-approved labeling. Physicians should consult the current manufacturers’ prescribing information for these products. ACHL requires the speaker to disclose that a product is not labeled for the use under discussion.

Contact Information for Questions About the Activity

For questions, contact Laurie Novoryta at Lnovoryta@achlcme.org.

Activity Details

Free CME
1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
Released: December 30, 2020
Expires: November 21, 2021
75 minutes to complete

Accredited By

Target Audience

This activity is intended for neurologists, headache specialists, pain specialists, NPs, PAs, and other HCPs who treat patients with migraine disorder.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  • Develop effective strategies for incorporating CGRP mABs into daily clinical practice
  • Formulate comprehensive management plans for migraine patients on preventative treatment
  • Review current treatment guidelines and patient eligibility for use of CGRP mABs

Activity Description

Join an expert faculty panel as they discuss incorporating anti-CGRP monoclonal antibodies into daily clinical practice for migraine prevention. This video-based session will integrate didactic presentation, a case-based panel discussion, and expert review of clinical evidence, guideline recommendations, special considerations, and real-world use.

Statement of Educational Need

Migraines represent a common, debilitating disorder that continues to be both undertreated and underdiagnosed. Ninety-five percent of chronic migraine patients do not receive appropriate diagnosis or care, and the few that do, suffer from poor long-term treatment adherence. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) monoclonal antibodies are an emerging preventative migraine therapy class that offer benefits over traditional systemic prophylaxis. This activity will review best practices for incorporating CGRP mAbs into daily clinical practice.

Chair

Jessica Ailani, MD, FAHS, FAAN
Professor, Neurology
Director, Headache Center
Medstar Georgetown University Hospital
Washington, DC

Faculty

David W. Dodick, MD
Professor of Neurology, Department of Neurology
Mayo Clinic College of Medicine
Consultant in Neurology and Program Director, Mayo Clinic Neurology Residency Program
Director, Headache, Sports Neurology, and Concussion Programs
Mayo Clinic
Scottsdale, AZ

Lawrence C. Newman, MD, FAHS, FAAN
Professor, Neurology
NYU Grossman School of Medicine
Director, Headache Division
NYU Langone Health
New York, NY

Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

The Academy for Continued Healthcare Learning (ACHL) requires that the faculty participating in a CME activity disclose all affiliations or other financial relationships (1) with the manufacturers of any commercial product(s) and/or provider(s) of commercial services discussed in an educational presentation and (2) with any commercial supporters of the activity. All conflicts of interest have been resolved prior to this CME activity.

The following financial relationships have been provided:

Jessica Ailani, MD, FAHS, FAAN
Consulting Agreements: Alder, Amgen, Allergan, Biohaven, Eli Lilly and Company, Impel, Neurodiem, Revance, Satsuma, Theranica, Teva, Zosano
Speakers’ Bureau: Allergan, Amgen, Biohaven, Eli Lilly and Company, Teva

David W. Dodick, MD
Board of Directors: Epien Medical
Consulting Agreements: Allergan, Amgen, Biohaven Pharmaceuticals, Cerecin, Clexio Biosciences Ltd., Ctrl M Health, Eli Lilly and Company, eNeura, Equinox Pharma, Linpharma, Lundbeck, Novartis, Impel Neuro Pharma, Nocira, Pieris Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Promius Pharma, LLC, Revance, Satsuma Pharmaceuticals, Theranica, WL Gore, XoC Pharmaceuticals, Zosano Pharma, Upjohn (Division of Pfizer)
Patent 17189376.1-1466:vTitle: Botulinum Toxin Dosage Regimen for Chronic Migraine Prophylaxis
Stock Options: Ctrl M Health, Epien Medical, Healint, Nocira, Theranica

Lawrence C. Newman, MD, FAHS, FAAN
Advisory Board: Allergan, Amgen, Eli Lilly and Company, Supernus, Theranica

Discussion of Off-Label, Investigational, or Experimental Drug/Device Use: None 

Accreditation Statement

The Academy for Continued Healthcare Learning is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation of Credit

The Academy for Continued Healthcare Learning designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nurse practitioners may participate in this educational activity and earn a certificate of completing as AANP accepts AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ through its reciprocity agreements.

Instructions for Receiving Credit

This activity will take approximately 75 minutes to complete. To receive credit, participants are required to complete the pretest, view the online activity and complete the posttest and evaluation. To receive credit, 75% must be achieved on the posttest. A certificate will be immediately available. There is no fee to participate in the activity or for the generation of the certificate.

Statement of Commercial Support

Supported by an educational grant from Lundbeck.

Disclaimer Statement/Disclosure of Unlabeled Use

The content for this activity was developed independently of the commercial supporter. All materials are included with permission. The opinions expressed are those of the faculty and are not to be construed as those of the publisher or grantor.

This educational activity was planned and produced in accordance with the ACCME Accreditation Criteria, Policies, and Standards for Commercial Support. Recommendations involving clinical medicine in a continuing medical education (CME) activity must be based on evidence that is accepted within the profession of medicine as adequate justification for their indications and contraindications in the care of patients. All scientific research referred to, reported, or used in CME in support or justification of a patient care recommendation must conform to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis.

This CME activity might describe the off-label, investigational, or experimental use of medications and/or devices that may exceed their FDA-approved labeling. Physicians should consult the current manufacturers’ prescribing information for these products. ACHL requires the speaker to disclose that a product is not labeled for the use under discussion.

Contact Information for Questions About the Activity

For questions, contact Laurie Novoryta at Lnovoryta@achlcme.org.

0.75
Vindico
Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder: What’s New in Diagnosis and Management?

Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder: What’s New in Diagnosis and Management?

Start

Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder: What’s New in Diagnosis and Management?

Activity Details

Free CME/COPE/MOC
0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™/COPE Credit(s)/ABO MOC
Released: November 30, 2020
Expires: November 29, 2021
45 minutes to complete

Accredited By

This continuing medical education activity is provided by

This continuing education activity is provided by

Target Audience

The intended audience for this activity is neurologists, neuro-ophthalmologists, optometrists, ophthalmologists, and other health care professionals involved in the management of patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

Learning Objectives

Upon successful completion of this activity, participants should be better able to:

  • Review the latest understanding of the pathophysiology and burden of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD).
  • Assess the diagnostic criteria that aid in the differential diagnosis of NMOSD.
  • Evaluate the latest clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of conventional and emerging therapies for the treatment and prevention of NMOSD episodes.

Activity Description

Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is a rare, relapsing, autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that is characterized by inflammation in the optic nerve and spinal cord. The diagnosis of NMOSD is based on the presence of core clinical characteristics, aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody status, and magnetic resonance imaging allowing for a differential diagnosis. Treatment options for NMOSD have been limited but three therapies have been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and others are under clinical evaluation. These approved and emerging options are changing treatment paradigms for NMOSD and enhancing clinical outcomes in these patients. Within this CME activity, experts in the field will review the latest understanding of the pathophysiology and burden of NMOSD, assess the diagnostic criteria to aid in the differential diagnosis of NMOSD, as well as evaluate the latest clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of conventional and emerging therapies for the treatment and prevention of NMOSD episodes.

Agenda

Introduction

Understanding NMOSD: Burden and Pathophysiology
Michael D. DePaolis, OD, FAAO

Diagnosis of NMOSD: A Closer Look
Andrew G. Lee, MD

Treatment and Prevention of NMOSD: Assessing the New Evidence
Dean W. Wingerchuk, MD

Conclusion

Activity Chair

Andrew G. Lee, MD
Chairman of Ophthalmology
Blanton Eye Institute
Houston Methodist Hospital
Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology
University of Texas Medical Branch MD Anderson Cancer Center
Adjunct Professor of Ophthalmology
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, TX

Disclosures: No relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Faculty

Michael D. DePaolis, OD, FAAO
Associate Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology
Flaum Eye Institute/URMedicine
Rochester, NY

Disclosures: No relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Dean Wingerchuk, MD
Professor of Neurology
Chair, Department of Neurology
Mayo Clinic
Phoenix/Scottsdale, AZ

Disclosures:
Consulting Fee: Arcus Medica, Biogen, Celgene, Genentech, MedImmune, Novartis, Reistone, TG Therapeutics, Third Rock Ventures
Contracted Research: Alexion, Terumo BCT

Reviewers:
Ashay Bhatwadekar, PhD, RPh
Disclosures:
Contracted Research: NIH-National Eye Institute

Ronald A. Codario, MD, EMBA, FACP, FNLA, RPVI, CHCP
Disclosures: No relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Purdue University and Vindico Medical Education Staff:
Disclosures: No relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Signed Disclosures are on file at Purdue University and Vindico Medical Education, Office of Medical Affairs and Compliance.

Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education’s Standards for Commercial Support, all accredited providers are required to mitigate and disclose to the activity audience the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of accredited content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the past 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the accredited activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears above.

Accreditation Statement

Purdue University is approved by the Council on Optometric Practitioner Education (COPE) as an administrator/provider of continuing education (CE).

Vindico Medical Education is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation of Credit

This enduring material is COPE-accredited for 0.75 continuing education credits and is approved for one (1) year from the date of original release, November 30, 2020 to November 29, 2021.

COPE ID #: 70320-NO
COPE Event #: 120677

Please consult your state’s Board of Optometry to determine if the CE credit may apply toward your CE requirement for license renewal.

Vindico Medical Education designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the learner to satisfy the Lifelong Learning requirements for the American Board of Ophthalmology’s Maintenance of Certification (ABO MOC) program. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit learner completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting MOC credit. Upon successful completion, learners who opt-in by providing their ABO ID and DOB (MM/DD) will earn MOC credits equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. The CME activity provider will submit learner completion information to the ACCME for the purpose of granting ABO MOC credits within 30 days of activity completion.

This enduring material is approved for 1 year from the date of original release, November 30, 2020 to November 29, 2021.

Instructions for Receiving Credit

To participate in this CE/CME activity, you must read the objectives, answer the pretest questions, view the content, and complete the posttest and evaluation. Provide only one (1) correct answer for each question. A satisfactory score is defined as answering 6 of the 8 posttest questions correctly. Upon receipt of the completed materials, if a satisfactory score on the posttest is achieved, Vindico Medical Education will issue an AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ Certificate immediately upon completion to learners who claim AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Purdue University will issue a CE Certificate via email within 6-8 weeks to learners who claim COPE credits.

Statement of Commercial Support

This activity is supported by an educational grant from Genentech, Inc.

Unlabeled and Investigational Usage

The audience is advised that this continuing medical education activity may contain references to unlabeled uses of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved products or to products not approved by the FDA for use in the United States. The faculty members have been made aware of their obligation to disclose such usage. All activity participants will be informed if any speakers/authors intend to discuss either non–FDA-approved or investigational use of products/devices.

Copyright Statement

Created and published by Vindico Medical Education, 6900 Grove Road, Building 100, Thorofare, NJ 08086-9447. Telephone: 856-994-9400; Fax: 856-384-6680. Printed in the USA. Copyright © 2020 Vindico Medical Education. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. The material presented at or in any of Vindico Medical Education continuing medical education activities does not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Vindico Medical Education. Neither Vindico Medical Education nor the faculty endorse or recommend any techniques, commercial products, or manufacturers. The faculty/authors may discuss the use of materials and/or products that have not yet been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. All readers and continuing education participants should verify all information before treating patients or utilizing any product.

CME/CE Questions?

Contact us at
Purdue University: Pharmacy-CECR@Purdue.edu
Vindico Medical Education: CME@VindicoCME.com

Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder: What’s New in Diagnosis and Management?

Activity Details

Free CME/COPE/MOC
0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™/COPE Credit(s)/ABO MOC
Released: November 30, 2020
Expires: November 29, 2021
45 minutes to complete

Accredited By

This continuing medical education activity is provided by

This continuing education activity is provided by

Target Audience

The intended audience for this activity is neurologists, neuro-ophthalmologists, optometrists, ophthalmologists, and other health care professionals involved in the management of patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

Learning Objectives

Upon successful completion of this activity, participants should be better able to:

  • Review the latest understanding of the pathophysiology and burden of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD).
  • Assess the diagnostic criteria that aid in the differential diagnosis of NMOSD.
  • Evaluate the latest clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of conventional and emerging therapies for the treatment and prevention of NMOSD episodes.

Activity Description

Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is a rare, relapsing, autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that is characterized by inflammation in the optic nerve and spinal cord. The diagnosis of NMOSD is based on the presence of core clinical characteristics, aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody status, and magnetic resonance imaging allowing for a differential diagnosis. Treatment options for NMOSD have been limited but three therapies have been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and others are under clinical evaluation. These approved and emerging options are changing treatment paradigms for NMOSD and enhancing clinical outcomes in these patients. Within this CME activity, experts in the field will review the latest understanding of the pathophysiology and burden of NMOSD, assess the diagnostic criteria to aid in the differential diagnosis of NMOSD, as well as evaluate the latest clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of conventional and emerging therapies for the treatment and prevention of NMOSD episodes.

Agenda

Introduction

Understanding NMOSD: Burden and Pathophysiology
Michael D. DePaolis, OD, FAAO

Diagnosis of NMOSD: A Closer Look
Andrew G. Lee, MD

Treatment and Prevention of NMOSD: Assessing the New Evidence
Dean W. Wingerchuk, MD

Conclusion

Activity Chair

Andrew G. Lee, MD
Chairman of Ophthalmology
Blanton Eye Institute
Houston Methodist Hospital
Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology
University of Texas Medical Branch MD Anderson Cancer Center
Adjunct Professor of Ophthalmology
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, TX

Disclosures: No relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Faculty

Michael D. DePaolis, OD, FAAO
Associate Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology
Flaum Eye Institute/URMedicine
Rochester, NY

Disclosures: No relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Dean Wingerchuk, MD
Professor of Neurology
Chair, Department of Neurology
Mayo Clinic
Phoenix/Scottsdale, AZ

Disclosures:
Consulting Fee: Arcus Medica, Biogen, Celgene, Genentech, MedImmune, Novartis, Reistone, TG Therapeutics, Third Rock Ventures
Contracted Research: Alexion, Terumo BCT

Reviewers:
Ashay Bhatwadekar, PhD, RPh
Disclosures:
Contracted Research: NIH-National Eye Institute

Ronald A. Codario, MD, EMBA, FACP, FNLA, RPVI, CHCP
Disclosures: No relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Purdue University and Vindico Medical Education Staff:
Disclosures: No relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Signed Disclosures are on file at Purdue University and Vindico Medical Education, Office of Medical Affairs and Compliance.

Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education’s Standards for Commercial Support, all accredited providers are required to mitigate and disclose to the activity audience the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of accredited content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the past 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the accredited activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears above.

Accreditation Statement

Purdue University is approved by the Council on Optometric Practitioner Education (COPE) as an administrator/provider of continuing education (CE).

Vindico Medical Education is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation of Credit

This enduring material is COPE-accredited for 0.75 continuing education credits and is approved for one (1) year from the date of original release, November 30, 2020 to November 29, 2021.

COPE ID #: 70320-NO
COPE Event #: 120677

Please consult your state’s Board of Optometry to determine if the CE credit may apply toward your CE requirement for license renewal.

Vindico Medical Education designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the learner to satisfy the Lifelong Learning requirements for the American Board of Ophthalmology’s Maintenance of Certification (ABO MOC) program. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit learner completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting MOC credit. Upon successful completion, learners who opt-in by providing their ABO ID and DOB (MM/DD) will earn MOC credits equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. The CME activity provider will submit learner completion information to the ACCME for the purpose of granting ABO MOC credits within 30 days of activity completion.

This enduring material is approved for 1 year from the date of original release, November 30, 2020 to November 29, 2021.

Instructions for Receiving Credit

To participate in this CE/CME activity, you must read the objectives, answer the pretest questions, view the content, and complete the posttest and evaluation. Provide only one (1) correct answer for each question. A satisfactory score is defined as answering 6 of the 8 posttest questions correctly. Upon receipt of the completed materials, if a satisfactory score on the posttest is achieved, Vindico Medical Education will issue an AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ Certificate immediately upon completion to learners who claim AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Purdue University will issue a CE Certificate via email within 6-8 weeks to learners who claim COPE credits.

Statement of Commercial Support

This activity is supported by an educational grant from Genentech, Inc.

Unlabeled and Investigational Usage

The audience is advised that this continuing medical education activity may contain references to unlabeled uses of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved products or to products not approved by the FDA for use in the United States. The faculty members have been made aware of their obligation to disclose such usage. All activity participants will be informed if any speakers/authors intend to discuss either non–FDA-approved or investigational use of products/devices.

Copyright Statement

Created and published by Vindico Medical Education, 6900 Grove Road, Building 100, Thorofare, NJ 08086-9447. Telephone: 856-994-9400; Fax: 856-384-6680. Printed in the USA. Copyright © 2020 Vindico Medical Education. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. The material presented at or in any of Vindico Medical Education continuing medical education activities does not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Vindico Medical Education. Neither Vindico Medical Education nor the faculty endorse or recommend any techniques, commercial products, or manufacturers. The faculty/authors may discuss the use of materials and/or products that have not yet been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. All readers and continuing education participants should verify all information before treating patients or utilizing any product.

CME/CE Questions?

Contact us at
Purdue University: Pharmacy-CECR@Purdue.edu
Vindico Medical Education: CME@VindicoCME.com
0.75 CME / MOC
Vindico
Trending...Dosing, Anatomic Dryness, and Treatment Protocols in Retinal Diseases

Trending...Dosing, Anatomic Dryness, and Treatment Protocols in Retinal Diseases

Start

Activity Details

Free CME/MOC
0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™/
ABO MOC
Released: October 31, 2020
Expires: October 30, 2021
45 minutes to complete

Accredited By

This continuing medical education activity is provided by

Target Audience

The intended audience for this activity is ophthalmologists, retina specialists, and other health care professionals involved in the management of patients with retinal diseases.

Learning Objectives

Upon successful completion of this activity, participants should be better able to:

  • Describe injection protocols that have been shown to improve the long-term management of diabetic retinopathy and neovascular age-related macular degeneration.
  • Explain how the persistence of retinal fluid post-treatment may influence visual outcomes in patients with retinal diseases.

Activity Description

The incorporation of intravitreal therapy into treatment protocols for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) has led to enhanced visual outcomes. In nAMD, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapies have demonstrated significant visual acuity gains, yet lack of patient adherence due to treatment burden can result in suboptimal outcomes. Dosing strategies that elongate the time between injection intervals yet maintain early visual acuity gains are currently evolving. In patients with DR, early intervention with anti-VEGF therapies has demonstrated significant slowing of disease progression and reduction of vision-threatening complications. In this educational activity, experts in the field review injection protocols that have been shown to improve the long-term management of DR and nAMD, as well as evaluate how the persistence of retinal fluid post-treatment may influence visual outcomes in patients with retinal diseases.

Activity Chair

Sophie J. Bakri, MD
Professor of Ophthalmology
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN

Disclosures:
Consulting Fee: Alimera, Allegro, Allergan, EyePoint, Genentech, Kala, Novartis, Oxurion, Roche


Faculty

Diana V. Do, MD
Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs
Professor of Ophthalmology
Byers Eye Institute
Stanford University School of Medicine
Palo Alto, CA

Disclosures: No relevant financial relationships to disclose.


Reviewer:
Ronald A. Codario, MD, EMBA, FACP, FNLA, RPVI, CHCP
Disclosure: No relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Vindico Medical Education Staff:
Disclosure: No relevant financial relationships to disclose. 

Signed Disclosures are on file at Vindico Medical Education, Office of Medical Affairs and Compliance.

Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education’s Standards for Commercial Support, all accredited providers are required to mitigate and disclose to the activity audience the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of accredited content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the past 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the accredited activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears above.

Accreditation Statement

Vindico Medical Education is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation of Credit

Vindico Medical Education designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the learner to satisfy the Lifelong Learning requirements for the American Board of Ophthalmology’s Maintenance of Certification (ABO MOC) program. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit learner completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting MOC credit.

Upon successful completion, learners who opt-in by providing their ABO ID and DOB (MM/DD) will earn MOC credits equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. The CME activity provider will submit learner completion information to the ACCME for the purpose of granting ABO MOC credits within 30 days of activity completion.

Instructions for Receiving Credit

To participate in this CME activity, you must read the objectives, answer the pretest questions, view the content, and complete the posttest and evaluation. Provide only one (1) correct answer for each question. A satisfactory score is defined as answering 75% of the posttest questions correctly. Upon receipt of the completed materials, if a satisfactory score on the posttest is achieved, Vindico Medical Education will issue an AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ Certificate.

Statement of Commercial Support

This activity is supported by an independent medical education grant from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Unlabeled and Investigational Usage

The audience is advised that this continuing medical education activity may contain references to unlabeled uses of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved products or to products not approved by the FDA for use in the United States. The faculty members have been made aware of their obligation to disclose such usage. All activity participants will be informed if any speakers/authors intend to discuss either non-FDA–approved or investigational use of products/devices.

Copyright Statement

Created and published by Vindico Medical Education, 6900 Grove Road, Building 100, Thorofare, NJ 08086-9447. Telephone: 856-994-9400; Fax: 856-384-6680. Printed in the USA. Copyright © 2020 Vindico Medical Education. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. The material presented at or in any of Vindico Medical Education continuing medical education activities does not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Vindico Medical Education. Neither Vindico Medical Education nor the faculty endorse or recommend any techniques, commercial products, or manufacturers. The faculty/authors may discuss the use of materials and/or products that have not yet been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. All readers and continuing education participants should verify all information before treating patients or utilizing any product.

CME Questions?

Contact us at CME@VindicoCME.com

Activity Details

Free CME/MOC
0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™/
ABO MOC
Released: October 31, 2020
Expires: October 30, 2021
45 minutes to complete

Accredited By

This continuing medical education activity is provided by

Target Audience

The intended audience for this activity is ophthalmologists, retina specialists, and other health care professionals involved in the management of patients with retinal diseases.

Learning Objectives

Upon successful completion of this activity, participants should be better able to:

  • Describe injection protocols that have been shown to improve the long-term management of diabetic retinopathy and neovascular age-related macular degeneration.
  • Explain how the persistence of retinal fluid post-treatment may influence visual outcomes in patients with retinal diseases.

Activity Description

The incorporation of intravitreal therapy into treatment protocols for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) has led to enhanced visual outcomes. In nAMD, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapies have demonstrated significant visual acuity gains, yet lack of patient adherence due to treatment burden can result in suboptimal outcomes. Dosing strategies that elongate the time between injection intervals yet maintain early visual acuity gains are currently evolving. In patients with DR, early intervention with anti-VEGF therapies has demonstrated significant slowing of disease progression and reduction of vision-threatening complications. In this educational activity, experts in the field review injection protocols that have been shown to improve the long-term management of DR and nAMD, as well as evaluate how the persistence of retinal fluid post-treatment may influence visual outcomes in patients with retinal diseases.

Activity Chair

Sophie J. Bakri, MD
Professor of Ophthalmology
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN

Disclosures:
Consulting Fee: Alimera, Allegro, Allergan, EyePoint, Genentech, Kala, Novartis, Oxurion, Roche


Faculty

Diana V. Do, MD
Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs
Professor of Ophthalmology
Byers Eye Institute
Stanford University School of Medicine
Palo Alto, CA

Disclosures: No relevant financial relationships to disclose.


Reviewer:
Ronald A. Codario, MD, EMBA, FACP, FNLA, RPVI, CHCP
Disclosure: No relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Vindico Medical Education Staff:
Disclosure: No relevant financial relationships to disclose. 

Signed Disclosures are on file at Vindico Medical Education, Office of Medical Affairs and Compliance.

Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education’s Standards for Commercial Support, all accredited providers are required to mitigate and disclose to the activity audience the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of accredited content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the past 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the accredited activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears above.

Accreditation Statement

Vindico Medical Education is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation of Credit

Vindico Medical Education designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the learner to satisfy the Lifelong Learning requirements for the American Board of Ophthalmology’s Maintenance of Certification (ABO MOC) program. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit learner completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting MOC credit.

Upon successful completion, learners who opt-in by providing their ABO ID and DOB (MM/DD) will earn MOC credits equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. The CME activity provider will submit learner completion information to the ACCME for the purpose of granting ABO MOC credits within 30 days of activity completion.

Instructions for Receiving Credit

To participate in this CME activity, you must read the objectives, answer the pretest questions, view the content, and complete the posttest and evaluation. Provide only one (1) correct answer for each question. A satisfactory score is defined as answering 75% of the posttest questions correctly. Upon receipt of the completed materials, if a satisfactory score on the posttest is achieved, Vindico Medical Education will issue an AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ Certificate.

Statement of Commercial Support

This activity is supported by an independent medical education grant from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Unlabeled and Investigational Usage

The audience is advised that this continuing medical education activity may contain references to unlabeled uses of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved products or to products not approved by the FDA for use in the United States. The faculty members have been made aware of their obligation to disclose such usage. All activity participants will be informed if any speakers/authors intend to discuss either non-FDA–approved or investigational use of products/devices.

Copyright Statement

Created and published by Vindico Medical Education, 6900 Grove Road, Building 100, Thorofare, NJ 08086-9447. Telephone: 856-994-9400; Fax: 856-384-6680. Printed in the USA. Copyright © 2020 Vindico Medical Education. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. The material presented at or in any of Vindico Medical Education continuing medical education activities does not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Vindico Medical Education. Neither Vindico Medical Education nor the faculty endorse or recommend any techniques, commercial products, or manufacturers. The faculty/authors may discuss the use of materials and/or products that have not yet been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. All readers and continuing education participants should verify all information before treating patients or utilizing any product.

CME Questions?

Contact us at CME@VindicoCME.com

0.25 CME
Medical Education Resources (MER)
Bridging the Gap Between Diabetic Primary Care and Retinal Specialty Practice - Unmet Eye Care Needs in Diabetes Mellitus

Bridging the Gap Between Diabetic Primary Care and Retinal Specialty Practice - Unmet Eye Care Needs in Diabetes Mellitus

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Activity Details

Free CME
0.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
Released: May 15, 2020
Expires: May 15, 2021
15 minutes to complete

Accredited By

Jointly Provided By

Creative Services Provided By

Target Audience

Primary Care Physicians

Learning Objectives

Describe the unmet need for diabetic eye care and the risks associated with delayed intervention.

Activity Description

Infinity Medical Education™ and infograph-ed™ have created a highly engaging, interactive learning experience. A series of three modular infographics will build on each other. The goal of this activity is to educate primary care clinicians on the most critical needs in diabetic care that are not being regularly met. Namely, patients are missing annual diabetic eye exams and are losing vision as a result. Primary care physicians are at the front line of diabetic care, directing patients through their healthcare journey, and these clinicians provide an essential touchpoint at which patients with diabetes can and should be directed to eye care providers.

Statement of Educational Need

Diabetes is a growing health crisis and primary care physicians are at the front line, directing patients through several other steps along their healthcare journey. Unfortunately, one of the most critical needs in diabetic care is not regularly met. Specifically, patients are missing annual diabetic eye exams and are losing vision as a result. Countless patients go blind because they either never enter the treatment continuum or they miss follow-up appointments. This comes at a time when retinal specialists are calling for treatment at earlier stages of disease.

The primary care visit is an essential touchpoint at which patients with diabetes can and should be directed to eye care providers who can deliver much-needed diagnostic services and treatments. This interactive learning opportunity will engage physicians and inspire a more proactive approach to patient education. Physicians will learn the unmet need for diabetic eye care and the risks associated with delayed intervention. Additionally, they will become well-acquainted with the science behind vision-saving treatments for patients with diabetic macular edema and diabetic retinopathy. Furthermore, this program will emphasize the potential advantages of moving patients into treatment sooner rather than later.

Topics

  • Growing incidence of diabetes
  • Diabetic retinopathy—a leading cause of blindness
  • Lack of awareness of eye disease risk among patients with diabetes
  • Dilated eye exam recommendations and frequency
  • Management and follow-up obstacles

Faculty

Carl D. Regillo, MD, FACS
Director, Retina Service
Wills Eye Hospital
Professor of Ophthalmology
Thomas Jefferson University
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

Medical Education Resources (MER) and Infinity Medical Education require instructors, planners, managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of this activity to disclose any real or apparent conflict of interest (COI) they may have as related to the content of this activity. All identified COI are thoroughly vetted and resolved according to MER policy. MER is committed to providing its learners with high quality activities and related materials that promote improvements or quality in healthcare and not a specific proprietary business interest of a commercial interest.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships or relationships to products or devices they or their spouses/life partners have with commercial interest related to the content of this activity:

Carl D. Regillo, MD, FACS, has disclosed grant research funded by Allergan, Genentech, Novartis, Regeneron, Kodiak, Chengdu Kanghong, Opthea, Adverum, RegenxBio, and Graybug. Additionally, he has received consulting fees from Allergan, Genentech, Novartis, Chendu Kanghong, Kodiak, Adverum, and Graybug. He has agreed to disclose any unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products referenced in her/his presentation.

Medical Education Resources’ planners and managers have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

The employees of Infinity Medical Education, LLC have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Accreditation Statement

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Medical Education Resources (MER) and Infinity Medical Education. MER is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation of Credit

Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 

Instructions for Receiving Credit

A statement of credit will be issued upon receipt of a completed activity evaluation form and a completed posttest with a score of 70% or better.

Statement of Commercial Support

This continuing medical education activity is supported through an unrestricted educational grant from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals.

Disclosure Regarding Unlabeled Use

This activity may contain discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the US Food and Drug Administration or European Medicines Agency. Please refer to the official prescribing information for each product for discussions of approved indications, contraindications, and warnings.

Disclaimer

Participants have an implied responsibility to use the newly acquired information to enhance patient outcomes and their own professional development. The information presented in this activity is not meant to serve as a guideline for patient management. Any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested in this activity should not be used by clinicians without evaluation of their patients’ conditions and possible contraindications or dangers in use, review of any applicable manufacturer’s product information, and comparison with recommendations of other authorities.

Contact Information for Questions About the Activity

Medical Education Resources
http://cmepartner.org/contact or call toll-free: 800-421-3756

Activity Details

Free CME
0.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
Released: May 15, 2020
Expires: May 15, 2021
15 minutes to complete

Accredited By

Jointly Provided By

Creative Services Provided By

Target Audience

Primary Care Physicians

Learning Objectives

Describe the unmet need for diabetic eye care and the risks associated with delayed intervention.

Activity Description

Infinity Medical Education™ and infograph-ed™ have created a highly engaging, interactive learning experience. A series of three modular infographics will build on each other. The goal of this activity is to educate primary care clinicians on the most critical needs in diabetic care that are not being regularly met. Namely, patients are missing annual diabetic eye exams and are losing vision as a result. Primary care physicians are at the front line of diabetic care, directing patients through their healthcare journey, and these clinicians provide an essential touchpoint at which patients with diabetes can and should be directed to eye care providers.

Statement of Educational Need

Diabetes is a growing health crisis and primary care physicians are at the front line, directing patients through several other steps along their healthcare journey. Unfortunately, one of the most critical needs in diabetic care is not regularly met. Specifically, patients are missing annual diabetic eye exams and are losing vision as a result. Countless patients go blind because they either never enter the treatment continuum or they miss follow-up appointments. This comes at a time when retinal specialists are calling for treatment at earlier stages of disease.

The primary care visit is an essential touchpoint at which patients with diabetes can and should be directed to eye care providers who can deliver much-needed diagnostic services and treatments. This interactive learning opportunity will engage physicians and inspire a more proactive approach to patient education. Physicians will learn the unmet need for diabetic eye care and the risks associated with delayed intervention. Additionally, they will become well-acquainted with the science behind vision-saving treatments for patients with diabetic macular edema and diabetic retinopathy. Furthermore, this program will emphasize the potential advantages of moving patients into treatment sooner rather than later.

Topics

  • Growing incidence of diabetes
  • Diabetic retinopathy—a leading cause of blindness
  • Lack of awareness of eye disease risk among patients with diabetes
  • Dilated eye exam recommendations and frequency
  • Management and follow-up obstacles

Faculty

Carl D. Regillo, MD, FACS
Director, Retina Service
Wills Eye Hospital
Professor of Ophthalmology
Thomas Jefferson University
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


Conflict of Interest Policy/Disclosure Statement

Medical Education Resources (MER) and Infinity Medical Education require instructors, planners, managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of this activity to disclose any real or apparent conflict of interest (COI) they may have as related to the content of this activity. All identified COI are thoroughly vetted and resolved according to MER policy. MER is committed to providing its learners with high quality activities and related materials that promote improvements or quality in healthcare and not a specific proprietary business interest of a commercial interest.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships or relationships to products or devices they or their spouses/life partners have with commercial interest related to the content of this activity:

Carl D. Regillo, MD, FACS, has disclosed grant research funded by Allergan, Genentech, Novartis, Regeneron, Kodiak, Chengdu Kanghong, Opthea, Adverum, RegenxBio, and Graybug. Additionally, he has received consulting fees from Allergan, Genentech, Novartis, Chendu Kanghong, Kodiak, Adverum, and Graybug. He has agreed to disclose any unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products referenced in her/his presentation.

Medical Education Resources’ planners and managers have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

The employees of Infinity Medical Education, LLC have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Accreditation Statement

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Medical Education Resources (MER) and Infinity Medical Education. MER is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation of Credit

Medical Education Resources designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 

Instructions for Receiving Credit

A statement of credit will be issued upon receipt of a completed activity evaluation form and a completed posttest with a score of 70% or better.

Statement of Commercial Support

This continuing medical education activity is supported through an unrestricted educational grant from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals.

Disclosure Regarding Unlabeled Use

This activity may contain discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the US Food and Drug Administration or European Medicines Agency. Please refer to the official prescribing information for each product for discussions of approved indications, contraindications, and warnings.

Disclaimer

Participants have an implied responsibility to use the newly acquired information to enhance patient outcomes and their own professional development. The information presented in this activity is not meant to serve as a guideline for patient management. Any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested in this activity should not be used by clinicians without evaluation of their patients’ conditions and possible contraindications or dangers in use, review of any applicable manufacturer’s product information, and comparison with recommendations of other authorities.

Contact Information for Questions About the Activity

Medical Education Resources
http://cmepartner.org/contact or call toll-free: 800-421-3756